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Parenting is not a "gap," it's the best work experience out there.

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As a resume writer for the past few years, I have advised moms who are returning to work to include this "gap" on their resumes. State something simply, such as "2005 - 2009, Stay at home mother [OR] Personal Leave." Or, like I put on my mom's resume:

1977 - Present, Domestic Engineer.
Responsibilities include financial advising, counseling, maintaining inventory, and completing all administrative duties. Other activities include chauffeur, cook, teacher, coach and sometimes warden.
:)
Ultimately, it's up to you to be comfortable with and be able to speak to whatever language you choose to include, or not to include, on your resume.
Don't forget to include things done outside of the home. When I was a stay at home mom I had time to do volunteer work at school. I made sure to include those skills and committees that I ran to show project management skills.
Having been in recruiting for over 10 years, I encourage stay at home moms to keep up on their computer skills, so if you have taken any classes while you haven't been working, be sure to include them as well. I agree with Shannon's post that it is important to include this "gap" on your resume. It takes out the guess work for the recruiter to figure out what the reason for the gap is.
Shannon I love it! Great advice and while I don't fall under the "gap" category for that reason, I have been doing my own consulting and freelance for the past ten years and am considering full time again. Do you think that appears "suspect" to potential employers or is it evident in these economic times that people are seeking security?
Hi Gabrielle - This is just my opinion ....

I've been in recruiting for almost 10 years, and have interviewed my fair share of consultants looking to reenter the structured life of a more "stable" corporate America. Generally speaking, a recruiter will probably probe your intentions to go from consulting to full-time a bit more than a non-consulting applicant. I'd recommend being prepared to address your motive for doing so. Most likely, you will be asked about it more than once.
Hi Deborah,

This is a little outside the focus of the site, but I'm wondering where to look. My husband received his Master's in International Administration in 205. He has a Grad Certificate in Homeland Security, speaks Fluent French, and has a undergrad in French/African Law yet he has not been able to find employment in his field.

Do you have any suggestions as to where/how to search for employment? We are in MI but are not against relocating (especially somewhere warm).

Thanks in advance!

-Stacey

Deborah Scanlan said:
Having been in recruiting for over 10 years, I encourage stay at home moms to keep up on their computer skills, so if you have taken any classes while you haven't been working, be sure to include them as well. I agree with Shannon's post that it is important to include this "gap" on your resume. It takes out the guess work for the recruiter to figure out what the reason for the gap is.

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